What court staff can and can’t do    

 

Until your case is heard by a judge or a commissioner, most of your contact with the Court will be with staff of the Court’s registry. Court staff can provide you with certain information relating to your matter, but they cannot give legal advice.

Woman listening to registry officer  

Court staff can:

  • explain and answer questions about how the Court works

  • give you general information about court practices and procedures 

  • give information about providers of free legal advice

  • provide or direct you to Court Lists

  • provide information about how to get a case listed

  • give you some information about your case file

  • tell you what forms you may need

  • give you blank court or registry forms

  • give you information about how to apply for a waiver or exemption from paying court fees.

Court staff cannot:

  • give you legal advice — only a legal practitioner can give you legal advice

  • tell you whether or not you should bring your case to the Court  - we strongly advise you to seek legal advice before commencing a proceeding or appearing as an unrepresented respondent in a proceeding brought by someone else

  • give you an opinion on what will be the outcome if you bring your case to the Court

  • recommend a particular lawyer to act on your behalf

  • advise you on which type of proceedings you should bring

  • tell you what words to use in your court papers

  • tell you whether you have included enough information in your court papers

  • tell you what to say in a court

  • talk to the judge or commissioner on your behalf

  • let you talk to the judge or commissioner outside of court

  • change an order made or signed by a judge or commissioner

  • explain orders made by a judge, commissioner or registrar.

 

 

 

 

 

 



 
 
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